THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE YOU MEET WITH YOUR BESPOKE TAILOR

THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE YOU MEET WITH YOUR BESPOKE TAILOR

There is nothing quite like going to a bespoke tailor to have your first properly tailored suit crafted – it is an age-old rite of passage that ushers men of all ages towards a greater understanding of the power of formal dress. At Bespoke we firmly believe that this experience should be given a place of honour on each gentlemen’s bucket list.

But where do you start? And what should you discuss with your tailor when you meet for the first time; how do you go about making the suit of your dreams a tangible reality? To help you along your way, we’ve put together this handy glossary reference that will give you a better idea of the terminology and talking points you can expect to encounter when you meet with your bespoke tailor for the first time.

Let’s start from the top down:

ABOUT THE SUIT JACKET

Lapels: We recently posted an entire article (link to notch lapel article) about the difference between peaked, notched and shawl lapels here. Go have a look to form a better idea of the differences between these options and what the implications thereof will be on the relative formality of the suit.

Single- or double-breasted: A single-breasted jacket has two halves that button together in the front with between one and four buttons. The most commonly requested version of this jacket features a notch lapel and three buttons; it is considered more classic in silhouette than the double-breasted jacket. A double-breasted jacket is more formal and features four to eight buttons with extra fabric that fold over from left to right.

Vents: A single-breasted jacket has two halves that button together in the front with between one and four buttons. The most commonly requested version of this jacket features a notch lapel and three buttons; it is considered more classic in silhouette than the double-breasted jacket. A double-breasted jacket is more formal and features four to eight buttons with extra fabric that fold over from left to right.

Shoulders: When it comes to the shoulders of your suit you will have the option of having padding or going without (also called spallacamacia). Padding is great if you want to create more visual bulk; spallacamacia creates a more natural line from shoulder to arm and is considered a more current silhouette.

Pockets: You will have to choose between besom pockets (set into the jacket like a slit with a plain opening) or flap pockets (the same, but covered by flaps).

Buttons: One of the marks of a true bespoke suit are the working buttons along the cuffs of the jacket that allows the wearer to roll it up if need be. You can however also elect to have buttons that are not functional and merely for show.

ABOUT THE SUIT TROUSERS

Pant break: The pant break refers to the way in which the bottom hems of your trousers meet your shoes.

  • Medium/half break: A slight amount of fold-over (industry standard).
  • Full break: At least one full fold over the shoes.
  • Quarter break: Just grazes the tops of the shoes.
  • No break: Justmeets the tops of the shoes.

Taper: The taper of your suit trousers (and jacket for that matter) refers to the way in which the lines thereof follow your body. The narrower the taper, the more closely the lines of the suit will follow your body’s natural shape; the looser, the less closely it will hug your frame.

Inner pockets: Your suit trousers’ inner pockets can be designed and fitted with all manner of customised details. Let your tailor know if they should accommodate things like tickets, money clips and cell phones.

Details: Bespoke tailoring also allows for novel details like side tabs and interior buttons. Side tabs go in the place of belt loops and allow you to adjust the fit of your waistband with buttons instead for a clean look around the waist. Interior buttons, on the other hand, are just the ticket if you wish to don some suspenders from time to time.

Side note: If you have an idea of what you want and can’t for the life of you figure out what all the various style elements are called, simply take along a picture or visual reference and ask your tailor to tell you more about it.

Stay in touch & keep informed

Now that you know more about the language of bespoke tailoring you are well on your way to getting the details of your dream suit down pat. Would you like to know more about bespoke tailoring experiences in Dubai? Keep an eye on the Bespoke blog for more insight into the fascinating world of bespoke tailoring and up-to-the-minute news about global gentlemen’s fashion. We have a panel of suiting experts standing by to keep you in the know.


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